Savvy Senior — April 2019 Columns

Savvy Senior – April Columns

  1. Finding Health Insurance Before Medicare Kicks In
  2. How SSI Can Help Low-Income Seniors and the Disabled
  3. Trikes for Grown-Ups
  4. Safe Ways to Get Rid of Expired, Unused Medicine
  5. Air Travel Tips for Older Passengers

 

Finding Health Insurance Before Medicare Kicks In

Dear Savvy Senior,
I will be retiring in a few months and need to get some health insurance for my wife and me until we can enroll in Medicare. What are my options?
About to Retire

Dear About,
There are several places early retirees can find health insurance coverage before Medicare kicks in, but the best option for you and your wife will depend on your income level and your health care needs. Here’s where to look.

Government Marketplace
If your yearly income falls below the 400 percent poverty level after you retire, the Affordable Care Act (the ACA, aka Obamacare) marketplace is probably your best option for getting health coverage because of the premium subsidies they offer, which will reduce the amount you’ll have to pay for a policy.

ACA health insurance is major medical insurance that covers essential health benefits with no annual or lifetime coverage maximums. And they can’t charge you more or deny you coverage because of a pre-existing health condition.

To qualify for the subsidies, your household’s modified adjusted gross income for 2019 must be under $48,560 for an individual, or $65,840 for a couple.

If your income is just above these thresholds, you should talk to a tax advisor about perhaps making a larger IRA contribution or strategically timing retirement account withdrawals to help you qualify. To see how various levels of income might affect your premiums and subsidies, see the subsidy calculator on the Kaiser Family Foundation website at KFF.org/interactive/subsidy-calculator.

To shop for marketplace plans in your state, visit HealthCare.gov or call their toll-free helpline at 800-318-2596.

If you find that you are not eligible for the subsidies and the premiums seem unaffordable, look into ACA-compliant plans that you can purchase off the marketplace directly from the insurance carrier or through a broker. In some states, you might find plans with lower premiums, especially on silver plans.

To find off the marketplace policies, see health insurance shopping websites like eHealthInsurance.com, or contact a broker or agent to assist you. See LocalHelp.HealthCare.gov to locate someone in your area.

Short-Term Health Insurance
If you can’t find an affordable ACA plan, you may want to consider short-term health insurance, which is much cheaper. These plans, which are not available in every state, are bare-bones health plans that provide coverage for three, six or 12 months – depending on state/federal rules. But be aware that short-term plans don’t comply with the ACA so they can deny sick people coverage. They don’t cover preexisting conditions and they can exclude coverage essentials like prescription drugs.

To shop for short-term health insurance, visit eHealthInsurance.com or contact a local broker or agent via LocalHelp.HealthCare.gov.

COBRA
If you need health insurance coverage for less than 18 months, another option you may want to consider is COBRA, which allows you to remain on your former employer’s group health plan, but not every employer plan is COBRA eligible. Contact your employer benefits administrator to find out if yours is.

In most cases COBRA is expensive, requiring you to pay the full monthly premium yourself. But, if you’ve already met or nearly met your employer plan’s deductible and/or out-of-pocket maximum for the year, and don’t want to start over with a new plan; or if you find your employer’s health plan to be better or more affordable that the other options, it makes sense to keep your current coverage under COBRA.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.
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How SSI Can Help Low-Income Seniors and the Disabled

Dear Savvy Senior,
What can you tell me about the Supplemental Security Income program and what are the eligibility requirements? My father is very low-income, so I’m wondering if this is something he may qualify for.
Searching Daughter                                                                    

Dear Searching,
Supplemental Security Income (or SSI) is a program administered by the Social Security Administration that provides monthly cash benefits to people that are disabled or over 65 based on financial need. Currently, more than 8 million people are receiving SSI benefits. Here’s what you should know.

Eligibility Requirements
To qualify for SSI your dad must be either age 65 or older, blind or disabled, and must be a U.S. citizen or lawful resident. He must also have limited assets and income.

His assets must be less than $2,000 or $3,000 for couples. This includes cash, bank accounts, other personal property, and anything else that could potentially be converted to cash. His home, household goods and one vehicle, along with life insurance policies and burial funds valued under $1,500, do not count towards countable assets.

The income limit to qualify for SSI, however, is much more complicated. Countable income includes wages or any other kind of money your dad earned from working, plus money he gets from other sources like unemployment, Social Security retirement, or gifts from friends, but also, free food or shelter.

In 2019, the SSI allowable income limit is $771 a month for an individual or $1,157 a month for a couple. So, if your dad’s countable income is over the SSI allowable limit (this is based on a complex set of rules and calculations – see SSA.gov/ssi/text-income-ussi.htm) he would not qualify. But if he’s under it, he would qualify for some benefits depending on his countable income.

To help you determine if your dad is eligible for SSI, help him take the Social Security Administration’s benefits screening test at SSAbest.benefits.gov. This online questionnaire takes approximately 5 minutes to complete and screens for a variety of benefits, not just SSI.

You should also know that most states – except Arizona, Mississippi, North Dakota and West Virginia – supplement the federal SSI payment with payments of their own. In some of the states that pay a supplement, your dad may qualify for the state payment even if he doesn’t meet the federal SSI eligibility criteria.

How to Apply
If you think that your dad is eligible for SSI,call 800-772-1213 and set up an appointment to apply at his local Social Security office.

To help make the application process go quickly and smoothly, your dad should bring his Social Security number; birth certificate or other proof of age; information about the home where he lives, such as his mortgage, or lease and the landlord’s name; payroll slips, bank books, insurance policies, burial fund records and other information about his income and the things he owns; his proof of U.S. citizenship or eligible noncitizen status; and if he is applying for SSI because he is disabled or blind, the names, addresses and telephone numbers of doctors, hospitals and clinics that have information related to his condition.

For more information visit SSA.gov/ssi or call Social Security at 800-772-1213 and ask them to mail you a copy of publication 11000 “Supplemental Security Income (SSI).” You can also read it online at SSA.gov/pubs/EN-05-11000.pdf.

Other Assistance Programs
Depending on your dad’s income, needs and location there are other financial assistance programs that may be able to help him like Medicaid, prescription drug assistance, food stamps and energy assistance. To find out what he may be eligible for go to BenefitsCheckUp.org. This is a free, confidential Web tool that contains more than 2,500 programs.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.
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Trikes for Grown-Ups

Dear Savvy Senior,
What can you tell me about three-wheeled bicycles? I’m 65 years old and would like to start cycling again but I have some occasional balance problems and don’t trust myself on a two-wheeler. What can you recommend?
Ready to Ride

Dear Ready,
Three-wheeled bikes – also known as adult trikes – are a great cycling option for older adults, especially those who have concerns with their balance or stamina. Here’s what you should know, along with some tips to help you shop for one.

Safer Cycling
If you’d like to take up, or continue bike riding, but worry about falling, adult trikes are a smart option to consider because of the stability they provide. With a trike, you can ride as slow as you want without ever losing your balance and you can put both feet on the ground while seated, which is very reassuring for many older riders.

In addition, adult trikes are also made with a low “step through” design making mounting and dismounting easier; they typically come with big tires that ensure a smooth ride; have ergonomic handlebars that are easy to reach and grip; and offer oversize seats (some even have backrests) for comfort and support. And, other than the frame, tricycles use the same standard components as traditional bikes do, so replacement parts are readily available, and repairs are not an issue.

There are dozens of different types of adult trikes to choose from with prices ranging anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. To help you figure out the right kind of trike that meets your needs and budget, here’s a breakdown of the different styles and costs, along with some popular models to check out.

Upright Trikes
If you’re primarily interested in a leisurely ride around the neighborhood for pleasure, fitness or running errands, upright trikes are a good choice. These are traditional upright-positioned tricycles that come with rear cargo baskets and limited gear options, usually ranging from one to three-speeds.

A great choice in this category is the Sun Traditional Trike (see Sun.bike/trikes) that cost between $440 and $550. For a less expensive option, consider the Schwinn Meridian Adult Tricycle sold at Walmart, Target or Amazon.com for around $300.

Recumbent Trikes
These are the low-to-the-ground, stretched-out frame trikes that allow you to recline with your legs positioned in front of you. Available in various styles, recumbent trikes are very comfy, easy on the back and aerodynamic which make them ideal for longer rides.

TerraTrikes (Terratrike.com) and Catrike (Catrike.com) are two of the biggest U.S. companies that make tadpole-style (the two wheels are in front) recumbent trikes. Or, see Sun Seeker (Sunseeker.bike), which sells several Delta recumbent trikes (two wheels in back) that offer a higher seat level. But be aware that recumbent trikes are much more expensive, typically ranging between $1,000 and $4,000.

E-Trikes
If you want a boost from time-to-time, electric trikes are a great option too. These trikes are hybrids that have pedals and a battery powered electric motor, so you can exercise when you want, or when you need a boost, you can let the motor assist you. A great place to find these is at ElectricTrike.com, which offer a variety of options ranging from $1,500 to $3,000. You can also find them on e-bike sites like PedegoElectricBikes.com, ProdecoTech.com and Evelo.com.

Folding Trikes
If you like to travel or if you have limited storage space, trikes that are designed to fold up to fit in tight spaces are another option. The Kent Adult Westport Folding Tricycle and Mantis Tri-Rad Folding Adult Tricycle sold at Amazon.com for around $300 are two popular options to check out.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.
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Safe Ways to Get Rid of Expired, Unused Medicine

Dear Savvy Senior,
What’s the best, environmentally safe way to dispose of old and unused medications? My mother has a medicine cabinet chocked-full of pills, some of which haven’t been touched in 25 years, and I’d like to clean it out for her.
Protective Daughter

Dear Protective,
Cleaning out the medicine cabinet is a chore that most people don’t think about, but it’s an important task that can help prevent medication problems, and protect children who may have access to these old, unused drugs. Here’s how you can clean out your mother’s medicine cabinet so it’s safe and useful.

Return Them
Your local pharmacy, as well as hospitals, clinics, long-term-care facilities, and narcotic treatment programs, might accept your mom’s unused medications, often as part of programs that collect and destroy unused drugs. Search for an authorized facility near you at DisposeMyMeds.org.

You can also drop off her unused meds at designated police departments, fire stations, and other sites on National Prescription Take Back Day, Saturday, April 27. To find a collection site near you, visit TakeBackDay.dea.gov.

Use a Disposal Kiosk
Many Walgreens and CVS stores have free, anonymous, and secure kiosks where you can dispose of any medication. Remove your personal information from the packaging and drop unwanted medication, including opioids, in the slot.

Mail Them
Costco, Rite Aid and CVS pharmacies sell postage-paid envelopes for customers to mail any prescription, including opioids and over-the-counter medications, to a disposal facility.

Throw Them Out
If mailing them in or getting to one of the drop-off sites is not an option, you can dispose of them yourself, but do so carefully. The Food and Drug Administration recommends taking the medications out of their original bottles and putting them in a sealable plastic bag with an undesirable substance like coffee grounds, dirt or kitty litter. Then seal the plastic bag and throw it in the trash. This will make the medication less appealing to children, pets or other people who may fish through your trash.

But don’t do this with dangerous drugs, such as opioids, which can be abused. For these, the FDA says flushing them down the toilet is OK. But trace amounts of drugs can end up in the water supply so this should be done only as a last resort. To see the FDA list of medications that should be flushed when they are no longer needed, go to FDA.gov and type “flush list” into the search box.

Another option is to purchase some medication disposal bags like the Medsaway Medication Disposal System. These are carbon pouches that are designed to neutralize all medication including narcotics, liquid medication, transdermal patches and controlled substances so you can just add water, and toss them in the trash. You can find medication disposal bags at some local pharmacies or online at Amazon.com for around $15.

You’ll also want to make sure to scratch out all your mom’s personal information on the empty medicine bottles or other packaging before throwing it away to protect her identity and privacy.

If you have other questions about proper drug disposal, talk to your pharmacist.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

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Air Travel Tips for Older Passengers

Dear Savvy Senior,
My son is getting his PhD next month and I would like to fly my parents in from across the country for his graduation, but I have some concerns about the flights. My dad is 82 and has trouble walking long distances and uses an oxygen tank for his COPD. What airport or airline services are available to help elderly passengers?
Proud Mother

Dear Proud,
Flying across the country can be exhausting for anyone, but for seniors with health issues or physical limitations it can be extremely challenging. Here are a few flying tips and a number of resources that can help.

Booking: When you go to book your parent’s flight, this is the time to make special requests that can help make the trip easier for your parents. You’ll need to make these requests over the phone.

For example, you may want to book preferred aisle seats in the front of the plane for easier access or bulkhead seats that provide extra leg room, and you should probably request a wheelchair or two with attendant(s) to maneuver your parents through the airports they will be departing from and arriving to, and if there’s a connecting flight in between.

If your parents don’t want a wheelchair, but still want some help, ask about electric carts.

You also need to check with the airline regarding their policy for oxygen units for your dad. While the Federal Aviation Administration prohibits the use of personal oxygen tanks during flights because they contain compressed gas or liquid oxygen, they do permit certain portable oxygen concentrators.

Getting to the airport: If your parents need help getting to the airport there are various senior transportation options depending on your parent’s location. To find out what’s available in their area visit Rides in Sight at RidesInsight.org.

Airport assistance: If your parents are flying on their own, most airports allow elderly fliers to be escorted to and from the gate by a non-traveling companion as long as they get a gate/escort pass, which he or she can get at the airline check-in counter by showing a government-issued photo ID.

But if no one is available to help your parents, find out if the airline can assist them when you call to book their flight. Some airlines offer special check-in and escort assistance to passengers that request it.

Or you can consider hiring an independent company like Royal Airport Concierge Services (RoyalAirportConcierge.com), who will meet your parents at the curb, check their bags, expediate all check-in and security processes and escort them to a VIP lounge and to the aircraft gate when they are ready to board. Costs typically range between $200 and $400.

If you parents need even more help, there are also a number of traveling companion services you can call on like FlyingCompanions.com and FirstLightHomeCare.com. These services will do everything including making the travel arrangements, accompanying your parents on the trip, and facilitating their needs along the way. Fees for these services will vary depending on what’s needed and travel costs.

Security and boarding: To help you parents get through security screening a little easier, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) offers special expedited screening to passengers 75 and older as well as those with disabilities and medical conditions. This allows them to move through security without removing their shoes or jacket, and some airports may have a special line. Call TSA Cares at 855-787-2227 or visit TSA.gov/travel/special-procedures to learn more.

When it’s time to board, your parents can also take advantage of the airlines pre-boarding option for elderly passengers who need some extra time to get on the plane and get settled. And for getting off the plane, they can wait for the other passengers to disembark so attendants can assist them with carry-ons and escort them from the plane.

Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

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